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in 2002 in pakistan and held at a secret prison in afghanistan known as the salt pit. hosed down and left in an unheated cell overnight, rahman died of hypothermia. neither prisoner had been singled out for special interrogation. they both apparently died of simple misuse or neglect. >> pelley: david, what are you hearing about the c.i.a.'s reaction to this today? >> reporter: well, this happens to be c.i.a. director leon panetta's last day on the job before he takes over as secretary of defense. none of this happened on his watch, but he is clearly pleased by the decision. he issued a statement, saying "we are now finally about to close this chapter in our agency's history." >> pelley: thank you, david. leon panetta will be taking over tomorrow for robert gates. today, president obama surprised the outgoing defense secretary with a going-away present: the medal of freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. gates was appointed by president george w. bush four and a half years ago and stayed on to help president obama manage the wars in iraq and afghanistan. we have done a number of sto
attacks against u.s. troops in afghanistan. two sources tell us that he was killed last month in pakistan by a u.s. drone. one official said to us today, "we know we got him this time." at the white house today, the president said he will begin sending condolence letters to families of troops who commit suicide in a war zone. troops who die in combat have always received this honor. but for generations, suicide victims have not been acknowledged by the president. the white house has been reviewing this policy, but mr. obama took action one week after elaine quijano first reported this story on our broadcast. elaine? >> reporter: well, scott, the president says he made the change to the condolence letter policy to remove the stigma associated with one of the unseen wounds of war-- suicide. in a written statement, the president said: the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that th
in the south and to the eastern border with pakistan where al qaeda still operates. general david petraeus is retiring from the army later this month and will become the new director of the c.i.a. mandy clark spoke with him today in kabul about the way forward in afghanistan. >> reporter: the last days of general david petraeus's command have been marked by two major events: the president's decision to begin withdrawing u.s. forces and, days later, an audacious attack on one of kabul's most important hotels. general petraeus told us the assault should not be seen as a setback. do you really think that the afghan security forces are ready if they can't protect a major hotel in the capital? >> i can tell you that our special forces who were supporting-- not leading and not doing-- for the afghan forces, who saw the crisis response unit, said that they responded very courageously. in fact, that they took the loss of life with the wounded in action i think underscores that fact. >> reporter: but the training of afghan forces is uneven at best. witnesses at the hotel told us some afghan police
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